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Property tax hikes will hit economy hard

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Property tax hikes will hit economy hard

The state government’s planned property tax increases risk wiping the state off the global investment map, warns Chris Mountford,
executive director of Property Council Queensland.Kevin Farmer

THE state government’s planned property tax increases, due to come into effect on July 1, risk wiping the state off the global investment map.
As the government begins work on the State Budget, the Property Council is ramping up efforts to highlight the hidden effects of the tax hikes.

These tax hikes will increase the cost of doing business, damage Queensland’s economic competitiveness and impact on every Queenslander.

With Queensland preparing to leverage the Commonwealth Games to attract new investment opportunities, these tax increases couldn’t come at a worse time.

Election campaign costings, released in the days prior to the November 2017 state election, revealed the government’s intention to introduce new land tax thresholds for aggregated land holdings with an unimproved value above $10 million.

Individuals, companies and trusts who are within this new threshold will be subjected to a 25% increase in the rate of land tax from July 1.

The government has also committed to increasing the stamp duty surcharge on foreign buyers of residential property from 3% to 7%.

The end result of this decision will be higher business rents, higher costs for new homes and damage to Queensland’s reputation as an investment destination.

Businesses who lease premises from larger landlords can expect additional rental and occupancy costs.

New homebuyers can expect an additional $800-$1000 added to the cost of purchasing a new home.

We once were able to lure investment from interstate and overseas with attractive tax rates, but we now find ourselves uncompetitive with our southern neighbours.

The Property Council is calling for the government to abandon the tax increases and commit to review and modernise Queensland’s property tax framework.

Our current land tax thresholds haven’t been changed in a decade, leading to significant bracket creep as property values have increased dramatically.

We need a simpler, fairer and more attractive property tax system to unlock investment and create jobs.

An all-encompassing review of Queensland’s outdated thresholds and property tax rates needs to be undertaken to put Queensland back on the investment map.

Chris Mountford is executive director of Property Council Queensland.

Source: brisbaneinvestor.com.au

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Opinion

House prices: Australia’s property market facing longest downturn in decades

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australian property

Aussie homeowners could find the value of their properties slashed by as much as 15 per cent as our housing slump deepens. It seems there’s no relief in sight for Australian property owners as experts warn house prices will continue to tumble well into next year.

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Experts warn of ‘debt bomb’ as housing downturn worsens

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debt bomb
AUSTRALIA is facing a “debt crisis” — and the property market and our entire economy are at risk as a result.

That’s according to the sobering 60 Minutes segment Bricks and Slaughter which aired last night, revealing the country’s property downturn was just the tip of the iceberg.

According to reporter Tom Steinfort, the current slump is actually “more like falling off a cliff”, with a number of real estate and finance experts claiming houses could plummet in value by up to 40 per cent in the next 12 months.

If that happens, it would also cause an economic “catastrophe”.

Mr Steinfort spoke with data scientist Martin North from Digital Finance Analytics, who said Australia was uniquely vulnerable when it came to an economic crash tied to a property downturn.

“At the worst end of the spectrum, if everything turns against us we could see property prices 40-45 per cent down from their peaks, which is a huge deal,” he said.

“There’s $1.7 trillion held by the banks in mortgages for owner-occupies and investors. And that’s about 65 per cent of their total lending.

“That’s higher than any other country in the Western world by a long way.

“There’s probably no country in the world more susceptible to the ramifications of a housing crash than Australia. We are uniquely exposed at the moment.”

Mr North said Australia was now in the same position as the US was back in 2006 and 2007 — a position which triggered an economic collapse.

“As a society, and as a government, and as a regulatory system, we’re all banking on the home price engine that just goes on giving and giving and giving. It’s not going to,” he said.

“We’ve got a debt bomb, we’ve got a debt crisis and at some point it’s going to explode in our face.”

debt bomb

Melbourne homeowner Mohammed Souid told 60 Minutes his family was experiencing mortgage stress. Picture: 60 MinutesSource:Supplied

It’s a sentiment shared by Laing and Simmons real estate agent Peter Younan, who said the median house price in his patch in Granville in Sydney’s west had dropped from $1.2 million to $1 million in just one year — a shocking $200,000 plummet.

He said foreclosures had also risen by 600 per cent in the region.

“The mortgage stress is definitely being felt especially in this area,” he said.

60 Minutes also spoke with several Aussie homeowners who gave harrowing details of the stress they faced trying to pay off their mortgages, including having their power turned off and being “hounded’ by their banks.

What does a million dollars buy in Aussie capital cities?

debt bomb

Market analyst Louis Christopher of SQM Research said the market had been “clearly overvalued”, labelling the downturn as the “correction we had to have” — at least in Sydney and Melbourne.

“On our numbers, Sydney was effectively over 40 per cent overvalued. And Melbourne was overvalued by about the same amount,” he said.

But property investor Bushy Martin said the blame lay squarely at the feet of buyers who “mortgaged themselves up to their eyeballs” in a bid to snap up dream homes before being able to afford them.

debt bomb

Property investor Bushy Martin says homeowners are to blame for the crisis. Picture: 60 MinutesSource:Supplied

However, the segment has also sparked backlash online, with some claiming the situation had been exaggerated.

One Reddit user branded the report as an example of “alarmist journalism and scare tactics”, while another said it was “dramatic and cringe-worthy”.

Others also criticised the segment for making it seem like all homeowners would be affected, when the downturn was actually mainly focused in the NSW and Victorian capitals.

And some said it was unfair to blame the banks for the situation, and that homeowners needed to take responsibility for their own decisions.

That was in response to comments made by one homeowner on the program, who said the bank had “suddenly switched the mortgage to interest and principal”, raising his repayments by 57 per cent.

“The interest only part annoyed me the most. The bank didn’t ‘suddenly change’ your repayment from (interest only) to (Principal and interest) your IO term expired. You a) knew this would happen and b) assumed the bank would renew it when it expired. I hope this speculator gets burnt first,” one Reddit user said.

Related articles: Experts warn of ‘debt bomb’ as housing downturn worsens

Source: news.com.au

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Opinion

This suburb has been identified as one of Australia’s most consistent property markets and it’s on the Gold Coast

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ONE of Australia’s most consistent property markets is on the Gold Coast and is primed for future price growth.

Clear Island, where this home at 8 Istana View is listed for sale is among Australia’s most consistent property markets.

ONE of Australia’s most consistent property markets is on the Gold Coast and is primed for future price growth.

Clear Island Waters has been identified in the latest Hotspotting Price Predictor Report in the top four most consistent Australian suburbs for property sales.

According to Terry Ryder of Hotspotting the suburb was one which recorded a consistent level of sales and demand quarter after quarter.

It has recorded about 40 property sales every quarter for the past two years, despite its high median house price of $1,150,000.

It’s median house price increased by 16 per cent in the past 12 months.

Mr Ryder said consistent sales patterns were generally a precursor to price growth and that suburbs such as Clear Island Waters “represented safety for investors’’.

“They are usually not boom markets, but have the valuable quality of solidity. And markets with this high level of even performance often have good price growth over time,’’ he said.

Mr Ryder said it was an exampled that consistent markets could produce good price growth in the short-term and steady long-term capital growth rates.

Real Estate Institute of Queensland Zone Chair Andrew Henderson predicts a lift in buyer activity on the Gold Coast during spring.

The Gold Coast has grown up

gold coast houses

“Historically as the weather warms up moving into springtime we also see an increase in buyer market activity and there is a rise in the number of properties being listed for sale with planned spring auction dates,’’ he said.

“We are anticipating continuing buyer activity with the strong migration numbers to the Gold Coast form interstate and also with the number of auctions being conducted increasing each week.’’

Mr Henderson said units close to the beach were in demand from owner occupiers, property investors and also those looking for a beachside “weekender”.

Source: www.news.com.au

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